Como Sur | South American Gastronomy

[El Comercio]

Albert Adriá's Nikkei Hot Spot
Pakta Got A Michelin Star

[Patrick Hieger]

Inside Santa Cruz, Bolivia's
Mercado Abasto Sur

[Patrick Hieger]

Lima's Urban Kitchen Celebrates
Year One With All Star Classes

Osaka’s Ciro Watanabe Wants To Open Two Restaurants Next Year (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Paula]

[Paula]

2014 has already been a big year for Ciro Watanabe.  The Peruvian chef, who now calls Santiago home, is one of the judges on the wildly successful new Top Chef Chile.  Osaka jumped 18 spots on this year’s Latin America’s 50 Best list.  And he’s lost a ton of weight, thanks to a risky decision.  2015 looks like it will be even bigger for the 34-year old.

In this new interview with Paula magazine, read about the incredible journey that the young chef has had in just five years since moving to Santiago, and the good that is yet to come next year.  We can expect a couple of restaurants, a cookbook, and most likely another jump in the rankings.  And hopefully another season of Top Chef

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Jockey Club Montevideo Has A New Restaurant (ES)

By Majo Lois

[Jockey Club]

[Jockey Club]

Open for just a few weeks, the new restaurant at the Jockey Club promises to be an obligatory culinary stop on 18 de Julio, the main avenue in Montevideo. The building where the restaurant is housed dates back to 1920, designed by the Frenchman José Carré, and is a marvel that was abandoned for years.  Taken over by the Grupo Pestana, there will soon be a hotel, but for now trying out the restaurant remains a great temptation.  Marco Bonino is the chef in charge who has had an eclectic career in Spanish kitchens, luxury yachts, and coastal restaurants in Uruguay.  He refers to the menu as “market style” putting emphasis on fresh ingredients and classic dishes–what you read is what you get.  They offer executive menus and daring menu options.  There is also a great cocktail bar that hopes to create a profile all its own. 

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Santiago’s New ‘El Colectivo’ Presents Pig Vicious, December 12 (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[El Colectivo]

[El Colectivo]

In case you haven’t heard yet Santiago, there’s a new culinary collective brewing, and they’d like to change how you’re eating.  Appropriately dubbed ‘El Colectivo,’ this new group, made from the owners Beervana, Soul Kitchen, Colmado, Salvador Cocina y Café, and Coffee Culture, is gearing up to bring a whole new style of eating to Santiago and beyond.  Eager eaters can expect pop-ups, special dinners, culinary events, and even a new take on food festivals that will undoubtedly draw a lot of attention to the Chilean capital.  Below, you can read their manifesto.

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‘Dos Mujeres Y Cientos De Vinos’, Peru’s Newest Wine Guide (ES)

By Maribel Rivero

[Maribel Rivero]

[Maribel Rivero]

Dos Mujeres y Cientos de Vinos is the name of Peru’s new one of a kind wine guide available in stores now.  The guide was written by Maria Claudia Eraso and Soledad Marroquin Muñoz, Lima-based sommeliers and wine writers. With a lot of heart, passion, and camaraderie between these two wine experts, the result is a useful guide for the novice to experienced wine buyer.  The ranking is based on a five-star system for all wines, done with a blind tasting.  Dos Mujeres y Cientos de Vinos is only available in Spanish at this time.  Locations to purchase the guide at S./40 include Ibrerias Crisol, Almendariz Stores, El Pozito, Arabica de LarcoMar and Tostaduria Bisetti.

Soledad Marroquin Muñoz writes for Somos and El Comercio covering wine and spirits as well as gastronomy.  She also maintains her blog Destilando Pisco. Maria Claudia Eraso is a sommelier originally from Mendoza, Argentina.  Her background includes service with Resto, Park Hyatt Mendoza, Hosteria Los Nostros, Astrid y Gaston Buenos Aires, Madrid and Bogota, Grupo Inverleoka Colombia and Grupo Orient Express Peru.  Currently she is the Director of Content for Almendariz News and Wine magazine and Vivanda magazine.  

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Watch Gastón And His Leche De Tigre Gang Take Over Paris (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Punto Final]

[Punto Final]

It’s been a big year for Gastón Acurio and his roving gang of cevicheros, La Pandilla de Leche de Tigre.  They kicked things off in Santiago with a party at La Mar.  Then they headed to Miami, Bogotá, Spain, and Buenos Aires, stealing hearts and spicing things up.  Last week they headed to the motherland, France, not just to stir up some ceviche, but to share kitchens with the likes of Alain Ducasse, one of France’s top chefs of all time.  He did French, they did Peruvian.  Stomachs rejoiced.

For those of us that weren’t there, get a taste of what it’s like when the hottest destination in South America brings some heat to where modern cooking as we know it began.  Watch Acurio and his gang talk about their Peru, why travel is important, and even what Alain Ducasse thinks of the bunch and their country.  Just know that you’ll be craving ceviche and crepes when all is said and done.

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The Riches Of Ouro Preto In Minas Gerais, Brazil

By Joanna Marracelli

[Laurent Lhomond]

[Laurent Lhomond]

The Brazilian state of Minas Gerais is well known for its rich food, history and mines.  It was here where the discovery of one of the world’s richest gold mines took place.  This was the site of the first ‘gold rush’ where it was subsequently followed in places like Alaska, the Yukon and all over the world.  Once the capital of this state, Ouro Preto (whose name translates into ‘black gold’), was the epicenter of this rush.  At the end of the 17th century, it was known as Vila Rica (rich village) and by the beginning of the 18th century, it had one of the largest populations for any city of that time.  The area is home to many mines which you can visit to this day.  The gold ran out at the end of the 19th century resulting in a sharply decreased population. It was at this time that the state’s capital was moved to Belo Horizonte where it remains today.  Ouro Preto became another forgotten town until 1980, when UNESCO named it a world heritage site for its amazingly well-preserved colonial architecture and stunning baroque churches.

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What’s Going On

Mercado Surquillo | Lima, Peru [Maribel Rivero]

Mercado Surquillo | Lima, Peru [Maribel Rivero]

Many Shades Of Peru [How To Spend It]
Panama City’s 10 Best Cultural Restaurants [The Culture Trip]
Latest Trend In Restaurants: Shipping Containers [The Tampa Tribune]
Ten Wines To Watch From Chile, And Why [Forbes]
Ceviche Bajo Cero [Correo]
10 Infografías Sobre El Vino Que Te Van A Interesar [The Big Wine Theory]
¿Por qué Algunos Vinos Huelen A Frutas o Especias? [Vinomanos]
Lima La Sabrosa [Ciudadana B]

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Chile’s Luksic Has Registered ‘Zingani’ To Challenge Bolivia’s Singani (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Oxígeno]

[Oxígeno]

It appears that in a total WTF?! move, a subsidiary of Chile’s Luksic has registered Zingani as a trademarked product, to stop Bolivian Singani from entering the market.  Even though there is no doubt that Singani is 100% Bolivian, some people in Chile would like to deny that fact, and either create a product of their own, or deny Singani’s existence entirely.  Does this sound at all like another debate over the origins of yet another grape-based beverage?  WTF indeed.

Oxígeno reports that La Compañía Pisquera de Chile has registered Zingani–yes, the same thing, spelled with a Z–as a product of Chilean origin.  As if someone is debating this, because Zingani has never existed.  “CCU registered Zingani, with a Z, as a brand to protect their rights over its agricultural uses, according to Unibrander, the universal registry of brands.”  Once word of this gets out, we’ll keep you filled in on the action.  There will be plenty. 

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