Como Sur | South American Gastronomy

All posts tagged Bogotá

Protests Are Brewing In Bogotá’s Zona G(ourmet) Over A Proposed Pedestrian Area (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[The City Paper / Richard Emblin]

[The City Paper / Richard Emblin]

Although known by locals and tourists alike as one of the must-visit sectors of Bogotá, Zona G, otherwise known as Zona Gourmet, is at the center of a heated protest over a proposed pedestrian walkway. The new bill, being dubbed an “intervention,” was proposed by local mayor Mauricio Jaramillo, whose term ends later this year. At a cost of nearly $1.5 million US, the entire project would cover less than two blocks, and would add exponentially to the gridlock and noise problems that already plague the area. 

Leonor Espinosa Has Won Over Madrid Fusión (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Mauricio Moreno / El Tiempo]

[Mauricio Moreno / El Tiempo]

Although, lamentably, we’re not on hand at this year’s edition of Madrid Fusion, it’s hard not to be overwhelmed by the coverage that’s emanating from Spain. While chefs like Andoni Aduriz, from Mugaritz in San Sebastián remain the perennial favorites, it seems that, once again, South America walks away with the most applause. Tuesday in Madrid, it was Colombian chef Leonor Espinosa’s chance to take the stage and enlighten guests as to the incredible biodiversity that we’re finally starting to see enter kitchens throughout the country. According to El Tiempo, she took all of the applause.

It Looks Like La Paz’s Manq’a Program Will Head To Colombia (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Manq'a]

[Manq’a]

When Claus Meyer speaks, you listen.  It seems that when the Noma and Gustu co-owner mentioned in an interview back in September that he was thinking of bringing his non-profit system of cooking schools to Colombia, he wasn’t lying.  As part of a two-day workshop last week in Bogotá entitled Co-Creation: Gastronomic Schools In Colombia, Manq’a Bolivia was on hand to discuss implementing the program in Colombia.  No official opening date has been announced yet, but this will be a huge move for Meyer, the Manq’a team, and Melting Pot, as their ‘food for social change’ programs spread beyond the borders of Bolivia.  

Street Food In Bogotá? Ask A New Yorker

By Patrick Hieger

ASK THE PROS COLOMBIA.JPG

Although chef and restaurant owner Daniel Castaño was born and raised in Colombia, he’ll tell you quite honestly that he spent the formative years of his life on the streets of New York.  At just 18 years old, having shunned a traditional career in engineering, he headed off to the Big Apple and enrolled in culinary school, embarking on an education that would last more than 10 years, working with some of the city’s best chefs including Mario Batali.  During those formative years, while he mastered the art of pizzas and pastas, dreaming of the day he would open his own Italian restaurant and show off all he’d learned, he ate across New York, taking in the good and the bad, the high and the low.  He may not live in the city any longer, but he’s certainly still an expert.

Now that Castaño is back in Bogotá, running six restaurants with his business partner Camilo Giraldo that, in their own unique way, pay homage to his time in New York, who better to ask about eating on the streets of Bogotá than a seasoned pro who knows how to navigate between the mediocre and the excellent.  With a thriving street food scene that ranges from fresh juices to melt-in-your-mouth arepas, eating in Bogotá is as easy as heading out to the corner.  Knowing which corner to head to, though, is another story.  Below, we’ve got Castaño’s take on what’s best to eat on the street, should you find yourself hanging around Colombia’s capital city.