Como Sur | South American Gastronomy

All posts tagged Bolivia

Discovering Bolivian Gastronomy in São Paulo: Why It’s More Than Just Food

By Natasha Greenhouse

[Natasha Greenhouse]

[Natasha Greenhouse]

São Paulo has long been an immigrant city. Today, Bolivians are the second largest immigrant community, only behind the Portuguese. While some began to immigrate in the 50s, it wasn’t until the 80s when significant numbers of people began to come for the promise of jobs in the garment industry.  And there’s no sign of slowing down. Between 2000 and 2010, the number of registered Bolivians in the city jumped 173 percent. However it’s estimated that the actual number is five times that, to over 100,000 people. 

Chile’s Luksic Has Registered ‘Zingani’ To Challenge Bolivia’s Singani (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Oxígeno]

[Oxígeno]

It appears that in a total WTF?! move, a subsidiary of Chile’s Luksic has registered Zingani as a trademarked product, to stop Bolivian Singani from entering the market.  Even though there is no doubt that Singani is 100% Bolivian, some people in Chile would like to deny that fact, and either create a product of their own, or deny Singani’s existence entirely.  Does this sound at all like another debate over the origins of yet another grape-based beverage?  WTF indeed.

Oxígeno reports that La Compañía Pisquera de Chile has registered Zingani–yes, the same thing, spelled with a Z–as a product of Chilean origin.  As if someone is debating this, because Zingani has never existed.  “CCU registered Zingani, with a Z, as a brand to protect their rights over its agricultural uses, according to Unibrander, the universal registry of brands.”  Once word of this gets out, we’ll keep you filled in on the action.  There will be plenty. 

Inside Santa Cruz, Bolivia’s Mercado Abasto Sur

Patrick Hieger

[Patrick Hieger]

[Patrick Hieger]

Ask most any chef across South America, even the ones who go deep into the jungle or to the highest of peaks in search of exotic, foraged goods, and they’ll tell you that their local city market is a staple in their country’s, their city’s cuisine.  Santiago has the Vega Central.  Lima the Mercado Surquillo.  Bogotá has the blocks-wide Palo Quemao with an equally impressive flower market outside.  And nestled deep in the heart of South America, dead center in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, is the Mercado Abasto Sur, a sprawling behemoth of a market that showcases the incredibly rich biodiversity that, in the last few years, restaurants throughout Bolivia are starting to show off as they push to become the next “it” country in South American cuisine.  Spend even an hour traipsing through the labyrinthine stalls and rooms full of everything from hundreds of varieties of potatoes, bananas, and plantains, to exotic fruits, live chickens, meat on the grill, and much, much more, and you’ll see just why Bolivia has been getting their fair share of press lately.  And why they deserve it. 

Jardín De Asia La Paz Has Officially Fired Jorge Daniel Dávila Yika (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Jardín de Asia]

[Jardín de Asia]

Putting an end to what was, undoubtedly, one of the rockiest weeks in the history of La Paz’s Jardín de Asia, made so by racist and slanderous comments from Peruvian chef Jorge Daniel Dávila Yika, the restaurant officially let go of the chef as of last Friday.  Dávila Yika was part of a Facebook scandal in which he insulted Bolivia’s cultural history and their desire to have a coast line, saying that they had always lived in the shadow of Peru, his homeland.  Left with no other recourse, Jardín de Asia released an official statement on Friday, November 14, recognizing the chef’s talent, but their inability to stand behind his comments against the country where we was employed.  See the statement below.

A Peruvian Chef Working In La Paz Has Insulted The Whole Of Bolivia (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Peru.com]

[Peru.com]

It came as a bit of a shock this past Wednesday when Jardín de Asia, a Bolivian-influenced Japanese restaurant with locations in both Santa Cruz and La Paz, came out with a statement via Facebook expressing that the views of their chef and his comments do not reflect the views and values of the restaurant.  It was unclear what had happened, though quite obvious that their chef had, in some way, put his foot in his mouth.  News broke yesterday that the chef in question, Daniel Dávila Yika, a Peruvian who’d been living and working some time in Bolivia, made some rather harsh statements against Bolivia–as in, the whole of Bolivia and its culture–on his own Facebook page.

A Local’s Guide To Drinking On The Streets Of Bolivia (ES)

By Maria Paula Baldiviezo

[Patrick Hieger]

[Patrick Hieger]

The gastronomy in Santa Cruz is a clear reflection of historical roots and agricultural products from the region.  Spanish colonizers introduced cows, farming birds, rice, citrus, sugar cane, and from Africa, plantains.  In the regions more to the west, in the region of Los Yungas, the Spanish brought in coffee, and other items that became part of local gastronomy.  That’s in addition to local products like corn, peanuts, yucca, squash, and fish like surubi and pacu.  It’s from these roots that typical Bolivian dishes and drinks were born, and that nowadays, besides being a cosmopolitan city, remain part of the daily Santa Cruz diet, and one of the top attractions for tourists.  

I Have Written A Love Letter To Bolivian Sonso

By Patrick Hieger

IMG_2160

Have you ever had not simply a meal, but one product while on a trip that stuck with you for a long time?  One food that was so over-the-top delicious that you simply couldn’t forget it, to the point where you craved it and counted the days until you could return to eat it again.  For your own sake, though perhaps not for that of your stomach, I hope you have.  These are life’s treats that make travel that much better.