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All posts tagged El Baqueano

Video: Renzo Garibaldi At Cocina Sin Fronteras (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[The Great Cuisine]

[The Great Cuisine]

This is the video we’ve been waiting for. Last month, to kick off the 2015 season of Cocina Sin Fronteras in Buenos Aires, chef Fer Rivarola invited a couple of meat masters, Juan Gaffuri from Elena at the Four Seasons, and acclaimed Peruvian butcher-cum-chef, Renzo Garibaldi, from Lima’s Osso. The three got together for a one-night-only dinner that featured,  you guessed it, lots of dry-aged meat.

Watch Cocina Sin Fronteras Land In Mexico (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Restaurantería MX]

[Restaurantería MX]

As chefs like Rene Redzepi, Grant Achatz, and Heston Blumenthal take their internationally-renowned kitchens on the road, creating pop-up restaurants unlike anyone has ever seen, chefs Gabriela Lafuente and Fer Rivarola of Buenos Aires’ El Baqueano continue to create international alliances throughout Latin America. For the inaugural edition of the 2015 season of Cocina Sin Fronteras, earlier this month Rivarola and Lafuente headed to Mexico, to cook at the widely acclaimed Biko. Together with Biko chef Gerard Believer, Alejandro Ruiz of Casa Oaxaca, and pastry chef Jose Ramón Castillo of Que Bo!, diners were treated to a one-night-only feast that spanned the region and delighted the senses.

Cocina Sin Fronteras Opens In Buenos Aires This Saturday With Lots Of Meat (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[El Baqueano]

[El Baqueano]

Announcing a special dinner in Buenos Aires that will be centered around meat is kind of like announcing a taco tasting in Mexico City. But, when that meat-focused dinner is being cooked by one of South America’s best butchers, and two of Buenos Aires’ top chefs, the offer gets a lot more interesting. 

Cocina Sin Fronteras Kicks Off 2015 In Mexico (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Cocina Sin Fronteras]

[Cocina Sin Fronteras]

Now that 2015 is officially underway, it’s time for the regular events that we await with anticipation to get started again. Rather than having Latin America’s top chefs descend upon Buenos Aires for this year’s first edition of Cocina Sin Fronteras, chef Fer Rivarola of El Baqueano is once again taking the show on the road. For one night only, Rivarola will join forces in Mexico City with Biko’s Mikel Alonso, Casa Oaxaca’s Alejandro Ruíz, and Cholatería Qué Bo!’s José Ramon Castillo for a multi-course meal that spans hemispheres and the multinational flavors of Latin America

Watch Vallejo, Garcia, and Rivarola At November’s Cocina Sin Fronteras (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[The Great Cuisine]

[The Great Cuisine]

As the last dinner of 2014, the team at Buenos Aires’ El Baqueano decided to make November’s installment of the Cocina Sin Fronteras a big one.  To close out another successful year of dinners that included a gala event with Alex Atala, Nikkei cuisine with Mitsuharu Tsumura, and more than a few jaunts abroad to Chile, Venezuela, and Uruguay, Fer Rivarola and wife Gabriela invited their close friends and wildly talented chefs, Carlos Garcia from Venezuela’s Alto, and Jorge Vallejo from Mexico’s Quintonil.  Like we’ve been telling you since last year, if you have yet to make it to one of these dinners, you’re really missing out.

Watch Alex Atala and Fer Rivarola Educate BsAs During Cocina Sin Fronteras (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[The Great Cuisine]

[The Great Cuisine]

Even if you haven’t had the privilege of attending one of the epic Cocina Sin Fronteras meals that Fer Rivarola and the team at El Baqueano put on every month in Buenos Aires, at least you have the team behind The Great Cuisine to make stunning videos that at least give you a glimpse inside the experience.  Back in July, Alex Atala returned for his second appearance within the series, though this time the dinner was for a much great cause.  July’s Cocina Sin Fronteras dinner was a benefit for Fundación Alfarcito, which aids farmers high up in the Andes.  Dinner was held at the Faena hotel, and the more than 100 guests were treated to a multi-course meal that they won’t soon forget.

In yet another installment from The Great Cuisine, watch as Atala talks about the importance of community during a press conference prior to the event, then work his charm and culinary magic for a star-studded room of guests.  With Cocina Sin Fronteras already gaining a good amount of international press, we’re expecting more dinners of this caliber for next year.  For now, we’ve got memories, and they’re damn good.

‘Nueva Cocina Buenos Aires’ or 14 Minutes Of Why You Should Be Planning A Trip To Argentina (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

Screen Shot 2014-10-31 at 1.05.00 PM

[FugaCrew]

When we did a profile a couple of weeks back on three Buenos Aires cooks who are doing their part to ensure that not only Argentina’s most famous city, but Argentina itself, gets the world recognition it deserves for innovative, modern cuisine, we were really only scraping the surface of the talent pool that the port city holds.  For the past few years, cooks have been stepping out of the traditional Italian and Spanish influences that, while still wildly important, don’t necessarily reflect modern trends and what Argentina as a country has to offer.  A new vision is being created of what the future in Argentina can look like, and it’s pretty delicious.

In this gorgeous new video called Nueva Cocina Buenos Aires, meet a whole group of the modern Argentine cooks and restaurants that are taking new, daring approaches to reinventing this country’s legendary cuisine.  There’s a lot of meat, for sure, but there’s a return to the land, to working with producers, and to saying that Argentina is much more than just a land of cattle and fire.  It’s a rich land with a rich history, and a bright future.  And as we mentioned in the headline, you’ll probably want to book your ticket now, because the getting is just too good.  Provecho.

Argentina: A Culinary Coming Of Age Story

By Megan Chochla
Argentina Coming Of Age

We all know the stereotypes and the folklore about food and wine in Argentina.  There is incredible beef.  Malbec.  The asados in Argentina are infamous and often include a variety of cuts of beef and the king of sausages, chorizo.  Argentina is the land of empanadas and also yerba mate.  Slightly lesser known are the strong Italian and European influences, but after a couple of days of wandering around Buenos Aires and being assaulted by the choice of Italian restaurants that look like the dining rooms of grandmothers, there is no doubt in your mind.

Some people might try say that Argentina hasn’t had much of its own style when it comes to gastronomy, that it is too dependent on other influences, Italian, Spanish, other Latin neighbours. Others choose to view the history of Argentine cuisine as a culmination of some of the best of what these other influences have to offer.  Any way it shakes out though, Argentina has some delectable raw materials, world-class even, and as the gastronomy industry grows up here, the chefs here are very excited about what the future holds.