Como Sur | South American Gastronomy

All posts tagged #expansion

Ñam Expands, Improves For Its Fifth Edition (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Ñam]

[Ñam]

With culinary and cultural festivals throughout South America continuing to grow and become more wide spread, each country’s national celebration has to work hard to stay current and draw major crowds. Now in its fifth edition, Chile’s Ñam, the country’s largest and most important gastronomy festival, will be bigger, better, and more interactive than ever. The festival has expanded to six days, April 14-19, multiple sites, and this year will feature content for professionals in the food world and fanatics alike. 

Jaime Pesaque Will Open Oslo’s First Peruvian Restaurant (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Jaime Pesaque]

[Jaime Pesaque]

How will (can?) Peruvian cuisine fare in the far North?  Well, it seems that Oslo, Norway is about to find out.  Peruvian chef Jaime Pesaque, known for his Lima-based Mayta, as well as his outposts in China, Spain, and South Florida, posted a video teaser to his Facebook page today, stating that he’d soon be opening in Oslo.  Per our research, this will be the first in the region, and definitely one to watch.  Per the video, it’s not clear which concept Pesaque will be opening up in Norway, but with a rich fishing culture, ceviche will undoubtedly be on the menu.  Could this spur a union between Peru and the Nordic Food Lab, who recently sent two representatives to this year’s Mistura, for a new style of cold-culture ceviches?  Here’s hoping.

Expansion: Miami Will Get An Outpost Of London’s Coya (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Coya]

[Coya]

Peruvian food is now starting to transfer and expand between nations that are not the cuisine’s homeland.  Today Miami.com reports that Arjun Waney, who owns London hotspot Coya, has plans to open a branch of the restaurant in Miami’s Brickell district.  They also report that the restaurant “won’t be opening anytime soon,” although there is an address (999 Brickell Ave.).  Though not even close to the first Peruvian restaurant in Miami, a location of Coya will increase the profile of the country’s cuisine in the city, moving in alongside Jaime Pesaque’s SuViche restaurants and the newly opened La Mar, which seems to dazzling diners day in and day out.  Could a bespoke pisco list be the key to further Peruvian success in South Florida?  We’ll have to wait and see.  [via Miami.com]

Colmado Coffee Is Expanding (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Patrick Hieger]

[Patrick Hieger]

Easily the hottest place to get a cup of coffee in Santiago right now, Colmado is about to have a lot more than jo to offer.  Earlier this week they closed shop for three days for some initial renovations.  The main space is now entirely counter service, with a small kitchen in the works and more to-go seating.  This is phase one of a bigger plan to turn Colmado into a full-fledged gourmet emporium that will feature artisan goods like breads, cheese, and, of course, a great cup of coffee.

By the end of July, Colmado should be a fully-functioning two-level space with two areas for ordering coffee, as well as a fully stocked bodega.  Manolo and Ina, Colmado’s owners, tell us that the goal is to become a hub for the surrounding neighborhoods.  The new second level, set to be complete by the end of next month, will have a cheese room, a small library, a fully-functioning coffee bar, as well as as room for art displays and tastings of all types. 

Gustu Is Expanding, Sort Of (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[image: Gustu]

[image: Gustu]

It would be more appropriate to say that the team behind Gustu, and even more specifically Melting Pot, the non-profit school that gives underprivileged Bolivian youth the chance to learn a trade through gastronomy, is embarking on the next phase of their expansion, and it’s going to be delicious.  The new phase will be called Manq’A, which will be a series of schools that will open in the next year and a half focused on teaching bread baking and other aspects of cooking. Manq’a schools will be primarily located in the El Alto section of La Paz, working directly with the Santa Isabel Youth Center to reach out to underprivileged youth. 

[image: Lily Rouge]

Expansion! We’re Heading To Colombia!

With each new year comes new challenges, and ideally much to look forward to.  For us here at Como Sur, we are pleased as punch to admit in the case of both, that comes in the form of expansion.  Starting next week, writer Lily Rouge will be our eyes and ears in Bogotá, Colombia, as Como Sur starts making its way up the continent.  Needless to say, Lily’s pretty excited about the challenge, and we can’t wait to publish her reports.  From street level hearsay to the hottest restaurants, chefs, and events that aren’t to be missed, Lily and Como Sur will have Bogotá covered.  Ready? Lily is.  Read below. 

[image: Lily Rouge]

[image: Lily Rouge]

By Lily Rouge

The capital city of Colombia presents itself as a metropolis of delightful contrasts. Spanish-founded settlements and modern buildings coexist harmoniously on a high plateau. Once known as “The Athens of South America”, it still caters a rich offer in museums, libraries and universities for locals and new visitors. A booming economy has gradually expanded its influence ratio around the world, drawing investors’ attention at the pace of Vallenato-Colombian folk music.

As a result, transculturation has had a strong influence in consuming habits, regarding technology, fashion and, especially, gastronomy. Diner’s demands have become more sophisticated and local restaurants and bars are responding.  The strategy: taking advantage of the diversity of local products (such as maize, potato, cassava, meats, seafood, legumes and tropical fruits like cherimoya, guava, maracuyá and lulo, to name a few) and making a competitive product to promote local and international food tourism.

“La Macarena”, “The G Zone”, “La Calendaria” “Usaquén”, “El Parque de la 93” and the “Rose Zone” foster the culinary dynamics of the city.  The directors of this scene? On one hand, Harry Sasson, Leo Katz, Mark Rausch, Jorge Rausch, Andrés Jaramillo, Leonor Espinoza and Eduardo Martínez stand out as traditional top chefs/business people. On the other, Felipe Arizabaleta, Daniel Castaño and Luis Beatriz Vélez stand as the rising stars.

When visiting, the list of places to experience Bogotá’s cuisine is vast.  However, these are some places not to be missed: Club Colombia, Harry Sasson Restaurante, Andrés Carne de Res, Central Cevichería, La Mar, Bruto, Gordo, Mercado and Abasto.  Concurrently, when having some drinks: Bogotá Beer Company offers a wide national craft beer menu, La Destilería and Kong deliver very good cocktails and Juan Valdez Café franchises Colombian coffee on every corner.

Starting from today, I will gladly share news about upcoming events, restaurants, bars and much more happening in the city. Cheers.

[photo: Lima London]

Looks Like Round Two For Virgilio Martínez’s Lima London

[image; Lima London]

[image; Lima London]

Hot on the heels of last month’s first Michelin star, and only the third for Peruvian chefs worldwide, chef Virgilio Martínez and the team behind Lima London are looking to capitalize on the success of both the brand and the cuisine, and open another location.  Apparently sales at the restaurant have increased by 30% since they received their coveted first Michelin star, bringing check averages up to $90 US.  Whether in England, the United States or Peru, that’s a solid payday.  That’s also a great time to start taking advantage of the unstoppable wave that is Peruvian cuisine.

In an interview with Peru’s Gestión, Lima London’s managing director Gabriel González has said that the project is already in development.  As Martínez discussed in our recent interview with him, he’s not necessarily interested in blowing up too quickly.  As he told Gestión, “When we opened [in London] we were very cautious, we had a lot of patience.  We want to do the same with this new expansion.”  Patience is a virtue, and Martínez seems to have it nailed, along with a solid business sense.

Lima has been open just over a year and already received its first Michelin star.  Martínez’s Lima, Peru headquarters, Central, hasn’t yet been open five years, but this year was awarded the number 50 spot on the list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants back in May, as well as the number four spot on the Latin America’s 50 Best list in September.  That’s quite a pedigree for such a young chef.  Could he be the next Gastón Acurio, with well over 30 restaurants worldwide?  There’s no telling at this point.

Though Martínez and his manager González have said they’ll open another spot in London, there’s no official date set.  Martínez is also slated to open something with Gastón Acurio in the British capital.  Look out world.  Peru’s taking over.  [via Gestión]

[image: Peumayen]

Santiago’s Peumayen Talks Growth And Expansion

[image: Peumayen]

[image: Peumayen]

At just nine months in, Santiago’s Peumayen and their ancestral cuisine seem to have caught on with both locals and tourists alike.  Settled discreetly into the always hip, yet always up-and-coming Bellavista neighborhood, Peumayen offers an artisan oasis from the hustle and bustle of the surrounding bars, cafés and college-style eateries.  Inside, native woods, slate, and a wealth of dishes focused on indigenous Chilean cuisine awaits diners.  Meats like horse and llama, both cooked and raw, as well as a complimentary mini bread board that spans the length of Chile and its native breads are just a few of the surprises that await diners.

Local newspaper El Mercurio caught up with owner Andrés Gutiérrez and chef Juan Manuel Pena to talk about their first nine months, how they’ve grown and where they hope to head.  It looks like a line of products including ham and preserves are in order.  More space should be coming, too.  Apparently they’re not using up to 40% of the restaurant as of now, though that’s set to change in 2014.  More Peumayen?  Yes, please.  [via El Mercurio]