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All posts tagged #Maido

Mitsuharu Tsumura Has You Covered For Easter Dinner (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[A Comer Pescado Peru]

[A Comer Pescado Peru]

It’s likely that with Easter just around the corner, you’ve already made dinner plans that most likely involve pig in some fashion. However, if you’re tired of the hog on a stick with an apple stuffed in its mouth, acclaimed chef and owner Mitsuharu Tsumura of Maido in Lima, Peru, has a different option for you. Drawing upon his heavy Nikkei leanings, as well as some classic Peruvian cooking, Micha, as he’s lovingly known, has come up with a dish that’s as easy to make as it is delicious to eat. Chaufa criolla con chicharron de pejerey might sound complicated, but it’s as easy as fried rice with fried fish. Dress that up with a tangy onion mixture, and you’ve got yourself an unforgettable Sunday dinner. Provecho!

José Andrés Picks His Top Eight Spots In Lima (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Forbes

[Forbes

It seems that José Andrés can’t get enough of Peru these days. He’s already a great friend and collaborator with Gastón Acurio. Last month in Washington D.C. he unveiled his new China Chilcano, his personal touch on Peruvian food which has the U.S. capital screaming for more. Forbes magazine managed to catch up with the incredibly busy chef and ask him where he likes to stay when he’s hanging out in Lima.

Watch Mitsuharu Tsumura and Toshiro Konishi Talk Nikkei (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Vice / Munchies]

[Vice / Munchies]

Vice‘s food wing Munchies is going full Peru this week, with stories about cuisine from around the country, the two-part Being Frank filmed with some of the country’s best chefs, and now a detailed look inside the world of Nikkei cuisine, with two of the genre’s leading chefs.  Watch as Mitsuharu Tsumura, of the beloved Maido, and Toshiro Konishi, one of Nikkei’s “founding fathers” of sorts, talk about the cuisine’s origins, and what it means for Peruvian cuisine on the whole. Nikkei is as much an incredible story as it is a mouthwatering genre of cuisine that is a true fusion of the two of the world’s greatest cuisines. Be forewarned, though, this video will make you hungrier than a plate of MSG.

Talking Nikkei With Maido’s Mitsuharu Tsumura

By Maribel Rivero

[Maido]

[Maido]

“I am Nikkei,” Mitsuharu Tsumaura, most often referred to as Micha, tells me simply, explaining the meaning of Nikkei.  He’s a person of Japanese descent, brought up in a different country, in this case Peru.  Micha agrees with Ferran Adria’s summation of Nikkei in his cookbook, Nikkei es Peru.

“We are talking about a person from a given culture, one who was born and raised surrounded by another culture, which later becomes his own, a person who has the freedom and talent to create a combination between the cuisines of his two countries, blending them into a single style. Peruvian cuisine has so many facets of complexity that the average person experiencing the food of Peru may not understand.”

It Doesn’t Get More Nikkei Than This: 16 Courses At Lima’s Maido

By Patrick Hieger

[Patrick Hieger]

[Patrick Hieger]

Because of plates like ceviche, ají de gallina, lechón sandwiches, quinoa, and so much more, Peruvian food has quickly become the next great food that is, literally, on the tip of everyone’s tongue.  With a wealth of produce that can be found nowhere else in the world, biodiversity that spans five extremely different regions, and a whole slew of cooks that are putting it all together in world-class meals, Peru has it all.  What’s more?  They’re only getting started.  As diners across the United States and Europe get accustomed to the country’s classic flavors, there’s still an entire wing of Peru’s cuisine that’s just waiting to explode–Nikkei. 

[photo: Cocina Sin Fronteras]

Maido’s Mitsuharu Tsumura At Cocina Sin Fronteras, February 22

[image: Cocina Sin Fronteras]

[image: Cocina Sin Fronteras]

With the January edition of Cocina Sin Fronteras under our belts (coverage later today) and a schedule for 2014 that looks, nay is, unparalleled for a continuing dinner series, we couldn’t be happier to announce that the February edition of the Buenos Aires-based dinner series has been announced.  On February 22, El Baqueano chef and Cocina Sin Fronteras host Fernando Rivarola will joing forces with fellow Argentine Leonardo Choi, as well as acclaimed Peruvian chef and Nikkei king, Mitsuharu Tsumura.  A “dinner by six hands” as it’s being dubbed, the night plans to offer countless surprises.

Leonardo Choi is an Argentine native, responsible for the annual convocation, Chefs de Sudamérica.  He, along with Fernando Rivarola, will be accompanied by Mitsuharu Tsumura, whose Lima-based Maido is well on its way to becoming a darling of the international dining scene.  February 22 promises to be an unbelievable night of culinary surprises.  As usual, dinner will run AR $475.  For reservations, call El Baqueano at 011-4342-0802.

Will this dinner sell out?  Yes.  Should you make reservations now?  Yes.  So, hop to.

Maido | Lima, Peru

Reviewed: Maido, Lima

Maido | Lima, Peru

Maido | Lima, Peru

In his review of Mitsuharu Tsumura’s Lima-based Maido for Asia Sur, writer El Cuchillo attempts to answer the question (in Spanish), “What the hell is Nikkei cooking, anyway?”  By the end of his review, he seems content that whatever Nikkei is, Tsumura is clearly leading the movement, and the tasting menu is the way to go when ordering.  One question answered, he is left with another.  “What is the best restaurant in Lima?”  From Maido’s take on the fish sandwich to the lettuce wraps and even his take on pulpo al olivo, El Cuchillo leaves Maido feeling that there’s not much competition in Lima.  Oh, transcendence!  [via Asia Sur]

[image: Maido]

‘Nikkei Es Peru’: The Book

At a moment when chefs are quickly becoming stars in front of the camera as much as workhorses behind the scenes, we’re certainly not upset that the chef of Lima’s acclaimed restaurant Maido, Mitsuharu Tsumura, decided to chronicle the making of his forthcoming book, Nikkei Es Perú.  Due out soon (next month-ish0, Tsumura gave the audience at Mistura’s Encuentro Gastronómico a little taste of what’s to come.  For everybody else?  Well, there’s a beautiful video of the writing and production process.  Just be forewarned – you’ll be really hungry after you watch this.  [via Nikkei Es Perú]