Como Sur | South American Gastronomy

All posts tagged #meat

Video: Renzo Garibaldi At Cocina Sin Fronteras (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[The Great Cuisine]

[The Great Cuisine]

This is the video we’ve been waiting for. Last month, to kick off the 2015 season of Cocina Sin Fronteras in Buenos Aires, chef Fer Rivarola invited a couple of meat masters, Juan Gaffuri from Elena at the Four Seasons, and acclaimed Peruvian butcher-cum-chef, Renzo Garibaldi, from Lima’s Osso. The three got together for a one-night-only dinner that featured,  you guessed it, lots of dry-aged meat.

Cocina Sin Fronteras Opens In Buenos Aires This Saturday With Lots Of Meat (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[El Baqueano]

[El Baqueano]

Announcing a special dinner in Buenos Aires that will be centered around meat is kind of like announcing a taco tasting in Mexico City. But, when that meat-focused dinner is being cooked by one of South America’s best butchers, and two of Buenos Aires’ top chefs, the offer gets a lot more interesting. 

Watch: Francis Mallmann, Tango, Meat (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Nowness / Vimeo]

[Nowness / Vimeo]

Quite frankly, we really don’t get to see enough of Francis Mallmann just hanging out talking about meat. The Argentine chef, nay, legend, has perfected the craft of open flame cooking, always utilizing his home country’s native gold, beef. He may have trained in France, grew up in California, and even spent some time in Chicago, but while you may be able to take the man out of Argentina, well, you get the point.

Inside Bogotá’s Paloquemao Market

By Patrick Hieger

[Patrick Hieger]

[Patrick Hieger]

As South America rapidly becomes the next “it destination” for a whole new world of modern cuisine featuring unheard of flavors and ingredients that, until recently, were only known by locals, a new flock of tourists from both within the continent and outside are heading to the Southern hemisphere to get a taste of what some of the world’s leading chefs have to offer.  However, no culinary getaway to just about any country in South America would be complete without a trip to the markets that so many capital cities are known for.  Gastro-pilgrims looking to find the best of Lima know that after dining at Central or Astrid y Gastón, a trip to the Surquillo Market No. 1 is a prerequisite for a taste of caldo de gallina, or just to get their hands on one of the thousands of varieties of potatoes that Peru has to offer.  Locals in Santiago know that, if you’re looking for a true taste of the best that Chile has to offer, the Vega Central is the only place you need to go.  But it’s Bogotá, Colombia that plays home to one of the most remarkable city markets on the continent, Paloquemao.  With a footprint of more than four city blocks, a variety of fruits, vegetables, tubers, live chickens, fish, and more, as well as a flower market that would make the Dutch weep, Paloquemao is one of those markets even the most traveled chef can only dream about, and where hungry travelers can get the most authentic taste of Bogotá that a cab ride can offer.

Two things make the Paloquemao such an incredible market: size and abundance.  Located in the southern reaches of Bogotá, far from the Zona G and the abundance of high-end restaurants that make the city a tourist destination on its own, Paloquemao is massive.  Before you even enter the market, a stretch of parking lot nearly two blocks wide, and at least a block deep is covered in flowers.  Everything from roses to sunflowers, daisies, tulips and more are available in every color imaginable.  After you sift your way through the seemingly unending sea of floral delights, a market that is all at once maze, restaurant, grocer, butcher, and kitchen supply store awaits.  Finding the market isn’t difficult.  Finding a way to leave is much more of a task. 

The Anatomy Of An Argentine Asado

By Joanna Marracelli

[Laurent Lhomond]

[Laurent Lhomond]

I pity the poor Argentine on vacation in North America or Europe.  Oh, the shock and utter horror they must encounter when they are ready to prepare a nice little asado for the family and take that first look at the measly barbeque on offer.  You know the one I’m talking about.  The one that’s shaped like a ‘T’, topped off by a small, square grill, the sort you usually find down by the beach or park. With a surface area to hold about 3 hamburgers and 4 hot dogs (and that’s pushing it), it barely does the job for a family of four North Americans.  Let alone four Argentines.

I can just imagine as the unsuspecting Argentine approaches with a look of utter bewilderment and wonders what on earth could this ‘T’ shaped object possibly be? Could one even cook on that paltry, inadequate square?  Where the heck is the parilla? And then comes the dreadful realization that this is the ‘parilla’.   How the heck are you supposed to fit 4 kilos of meat (one kilo for each person is the norm in Argentina) on that thing?

The Anatomy Of A Uruguayan Chivito (With Video!) (ES)

By Majo Lois

anatomyofachivito

In 1946, Antonio Carbonaro, at his restaurant Mejillón Bar in Punta del Este, created this emblematic Uruguayan dish.  A foreign client entered in a hurry, when the kitchen had already closed, and ordered goat’s meat, which isn’t common in Uruguay.  In the heat of the moment, Carbonoro took out a sandwich whose key ingredient was thinly sliced beef loin, with warm bread, butter, and ham.  The client was not only fascinated, but the plate became a symbol of Uruguay up until today.

So, how do you make a chivito?

In ascending order, you’ll find a sandwich with bread, lettuce, tomato, meat, pancetta, egg, ham, mozzarella, mayonnaise, olives, and another slice of bread.  Chivitos are so popular that in Montevideo there are locations specialized in making exclusively chivitos, and the cooks who prepare them are experts.  The “chiviteros” basically work with two spatulas that they use to cut, flip, and move the ingredients on a griddle that’s set around 180 degrees.

Pablo, a “chivitero” for the last three years, taught us a few of the keys for a good chivito.

This Guy Will Cook Over A Ton Of Meat During Mistura (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

Meat Guy

This morning on the kilometer-long fairgrounds that is Mistura, all was quiet and calm.  Vendors were slowly peeling back the tarps to reveal their stands as they get ready for a ten-day selling spree that will see hundreds of thousands of people cycle through for the best of food and drink that all of Peru has to offer.  Over in the Mundo de las Brasas, the fires were roaring and the air smelled of sizzling fat, roasted pig, and pollo al cilindro.  The guys manning the fires will finish their days covered in soot, the mark of a day well spent.  Before the lines get hours-long and the meaty madness begins, we caught up with one of the cooks to see what the week has in store for him.  Over a ton of meat, that’s what.  Watch below, hear the sizzle, and get your stomach ready.  Mistura is officially open.

The Butcher’s Next Step, At Lima’s Osso (Part 1)

Today, in part one of a two-part story, our man in Lima, Greg DeVilliers, takes us inside Osso, the butcher shop in the eastern reaches of Lima that’s changing the face of Peruvian cuisine.  In just ten months, owner and butcher Renzo Garibaldi has managed to permanently stamp his name–and his flavors–on the exploding Peruvian culinary scene, cooking for greats like Massimo Bottura and Gastón Acurio, as well as making an appearance at Mexico’s Mesamérica back in May.  If this is what ten months can bring, there’s no telling what the future may hold. 

By Greg DeVilliers

[Greg DeVilliers]

[Greg DeVilliers]

Part I: Ladies and Gentlemen, the Butcher

Osso. Bone. A fine name for a butcher shop. It helps remind us where our meat comes from; it brings back the visceral to our carnivory. And to loosely quote the king in Gabi Nitzan’s Badulina, it makes for a great handle on your steak. Renzo Garibaldi opened up Osso, butcher shop and charcuterie, ten months ago in La Molina, a sunny, new-moneyed district of Lima and has since been celebrated from Spain to Mexico to Argentina.