Como Sur | South American Gastronomy

All posts tagged #Mistura

Mistura Will Return To The Center Of Lima In September (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Mistura]

[Mistura]

After two years on the lower stretches of Lima’s coast, spread out over a massive field featuring the best in Peruvian cuisine and culture, Mistura will once again return to the center of the city for this, its eighth year. In a note released earlier today, Mistura’s organizers, APEGA stated that the festival “returns after three editions to the point most central and historically designed to exhibit Peru.” Additionally, dates were given for this year’s festival, which will take place September 4 to 13, though without the Latin America’s 50 Best Awards, which have been moved to Mexico City. 

Mistura Wants Up To Up Their Culture Game This Year (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

Meat Guy

Although the 2014 edition of Mistura was bigger than any edition prior, featuring a whole ‘world’ dedicated to beer, and more food trucks than ever, it seems like the festival’s organizers want to make things even more interesting. Peru This Week reports APEGA, the organizing body behind the festival, and many other events throughout the year in promotion of Peruvian food, wants to bring more culture into the dining experience. “Festival organizers are planning to coordinate the food and stands with music, costume, and activities that pertain to where the food of that region originates within Peru.”

Latin America’s 50 Best 2015 Will Be In Mexico City (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[World's 50 Best]

[World’s 50 Best]

Yesterday in London, home base for Restaurant magazine and the organizers of the World’s 50 Best awards, a special event was held at the Natural History Museum to announce that the 2015 Latin America’s 50 Best awards will be held in Mexico City.  This year’s best Latin Female Chef, Elena Reygadas, along with fellow Mexican chefs and the Mexican Minister of Tourism were on hand for the event, making the move, which had been the hot topic of discussion at this year’s awards in Lima, official.  “We are super excited to be moving to Mexico to further explore and celebrate the region’s richly diverse culinary culture,” said William Drew, Group Editor of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants and Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants.

No official date has been announced yet.  There’s also no word yet on whether the awards will continue to move every two years, but cities like São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Buenos Aires, and even Santiago would also make for great host cities. The move does slightly interfere with the seamless transition into Mistura, but an awards ceremony in Mexico city could be paired nicely with Mesamérica.  We’ll keep you posted with more details. 

Talking With Jean-Edouard Tomme, The Man Behind Qaray

By Maribel Rivero

[Qaray]

[Qaray]

Qaray, the chef’s syposium at the center of Mistura took a drastic turn from last year, replacing a “rock-star” line-up with a more focused panel for this year’s emphasis on biodiversity. The person behind this change is Jean-Edouard Tomme, who comes to Lima by way of Belgium.  His educational background includes two distinct paths, one in cooking and restaurant management and the other in political science at the Catholic University of Lovain.  Two contrary subjects but perhaps fitting for the global state of food politics. His experience in development of micro-business in a developing country is what brought him to Peru.  For 12 years he has dedicated his experience throughout the countryside of Peru for the Ministry of Production.   His recent work with Apega included a variety of posts.  Just this past March , Tomme was appointed to oversee on this year’s symposium.  In just five short months Tomme has conceptualized the purpose of Qaray with a comprehensive manifesto.  He explains the reason for the change and the vision for the future of Qaray.

Peru’s Top Baker Needs A Business Partner (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Mistura]

[Mistura]

Although Serapio Aguilar may have walked away with this year’s top baker prize at Mistura, not all is well at home.  The baker, who’s been innovating on traditional breads with Andean ingredients, different flours, and his own recipes since 1984, might be forced to close his bakery if he can’t find a way to pay his son’s medical debts.  According to El Trinche, Aguilar is well over US $80.000 in debt, which doesn’t include interest, for treatment for a blood condition his 19-year-old son has.  It seems inevitable that his house will be taken from him, and his bakery soon after that, unless he can find a proper business partner to save he and his wife’s small store in the center of Cusco.

The original story was written for El Trinche by Marissa Chiappe, who works directly with Mistura.  If you or anyone you know may have leads for Aguilar, email Chiappe at marissachiappe@hotmail.com. 

The Big Winners At Mistura 2014 (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Apega]

[Apega]

Throughout the ten total days that make up South America’s largest food festival, Mistura, there’s a little something for everyone.  In addition to the chef’s symposium that draws talent and crowds from around the globe, there’s virtually no limit to the foods you can try, products to buy in the grand market, live shows, drinks, and more.  For local cooks, though, there’s prizes to be had, and winning can certainly make for a great year afterwards.  During the main week of Mistura, awards were given out for best ceviche, best cau cau, and best baker.

Eli Lupez Tuya, of Surquillo’s Bam Bam, took home the best ceviche award for his Widow’s ceviche.  He says he uses his grandmother’s secret sauce, which helps cut some of the acid of the lime juice.  For best cau cau, which is a dish of stewed trip and potatoes, a very proud Patricia Jesus Jaramillo Vergara took home the award.  And finally it was Serapio Aguilar who took home the award for best baker.  Aguilar hails from Cusco, where he and his wife run a small shop called Pan Huaro near the city center.  Each represent a steady foundation of artisans in Peru who are dedicated to singular dishes. 

Bernardo Roca Rey Wants To Make Mistura Ticket Prices Voluntary (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Patrick Hieger]

[Patrick Hieger]

2014 could end up being the most pivotal year for Mistura, the largest and most celebrated food festival in South America.  Although the festival was seemingly more organized and more celebrated this year than in any of its previous six incarnations, much of the talk outside of the festival still centered on how it could, and needs to, get better.  One of the biggest issues surrounding the festival is the ticket price, which many regard as nothing more than US $8.00.  However, for the thousands of families who support themselves on taxi and cleaning crew wages, getting a family of five through the door for U.S. $40.00, plus the cost of food and drink once inside, is next to impossible.

In a recent interview by Peru This Week, APEGA president and Mistura organizer Bernardo Roca Rey said that he thinks entry to Mistura should be voluntary, similar to museums.  “We need the government to realize the big picture and to broadcast the work we do. To have a concrete idea, they should have to construct a permanent place, so we don’t have to rebuild every year.”  Every year, cost remains at the center of the complaints surrounding the festival.  

The Morning After Observations: LatAm’s50/Mistura/Qaray/ShitShow Week In Lima

By Patrick Hieger

photo 5(7)

Although Mistura will continue running at full speed until this coming Sunday, now that the onslaught of awards ceremonies, after-parties, chef’s talks, food, pop-ups, shamans, hugs, kisses, selfies galore, and more than a few hangovers has basically come to an end, it’s time to look back at the past week which was, somehow, bigger, more livelier, and wilder than ever.  Last year a great sense of anticipation hung in the air, with most of the invited chefs hanging out waiting for their nine-hour dinner(?) party(?) Gelinaz! that effectively brought the chefs’ portion of the week to a close.  And while Redzepi, Atala, Aizpitarte and some of the other big names weren’t around this year, there was no less talent to be spotted at any given restaurant on any given night, on the symposium stage dishing out serious knowledge, or at some late night bender that went on into the early morning, a five-day long bacchanal that left more than a few hurting.

For daily recaps of the Qaray symposium that brought chefs like Rodolfo Guzmán, Jorge Vallejo, and Rodrigo Oliveira on stage, you can check those out here, here, and here.  Rooted in biodiversity and nutrition, this year brought some powerful moments, and convinced us more than ever that Latin America at large is going to set a whole new standard for what cooking can, and should be all about.  The chefs here care about the land, the people, and a new style of cooking that is probably going to start heading out of the restaurants and back to the land where food comes from in the first place.  That’s speculation mixed with a few overheard conversations.  We’re not making any promises, but keep your ears open.

Before we go back to the daily news reel, here’s a few observations from this past week’s epic mess of a good time: