Como Sur | South American Gastronomy

All posts tagged #origins

Origins: Cuy, How This Adorable Pet Ended Up On The Table

Today, we are excited to launch a new series called Origins. Although dishes like ceviche, arepas, and big fat pieces of Argentine meat have become popular outside of Latin America, there are a variety of other foods that have yet to be discovered. Our expert researcher and travel writer Joanna Marracelli will dig into the foods of South and Latin America, uncovering their history, and a little more about how they’re used. Enjoy. 

[Laurent Lhomond]

[Laurent Lhomond]

By Joanna Marracelli

Guinea pigs. Yes, I’m talking about those cute, cuddly creatures that are often found as domesticated pets in the homes of North American, European or Australian families. It’s what you do when your kid begs and pleads with you to get a cat or a dog yet you really don’t want to take on that extra added responsibility. Despite sincere promises of walking the dog or changing the litter box, you know deep down that your child will never do it.  But you hate to disappoint. So what’s the solution?  Why, strut down to your local pet store and return home with a guinea pig of course. 

Breaking Down The Pisco Sour, From Chile To Peru

By Colin Bennett

[Diario 16]

[Diario 16]


I hate to call it an “icon”, but that’s really the best way to describe what the pisco sour means for drinks in both Chile and Peru. After all, it is by far the most pleasant and recognizable way to enjoy this distilled grape brandy. Chile’s piscola seems better fit for student parties in parks, but anything mixed solely with Coca Cola can hardly climb the latter into “cocteleria”. And only a few well elaborated labels are worthy of sipping on the rocks.
This is not an attempt to comment on the origins of pisco, nor on who makes a better pisco sour, nor who really “owns” the name. That would only detract from what is an awesome way to kick off a dinner, a party or close out a meeting.  A quick cruise through the nooks and crannies of the internet will yield three principal theories on the origin of the drink, and would suggest a truly Peruvian origin: