Como Sur | South American Gastronomy

All posts tagged Street Food

Watch Bolivian Street Food Take A Dramatic Turn (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Somos Calle / YouTube]

[Somos Calle / YouTube]

As restaurants like Gustu and Jardín de Asia push hard to get Bolivia the overdue recognition it deserves for its native ingredients and intriguing cuisine, young cooks are starting to take advantage of the recent attention and experiment with new forms of bringing elevated cuisine to the masses. While new projects like Suma Phayata in La Paz are highlighting the traditional street treats like choripan and lechon sandwiches, a new group wants to push what’s available at ground level even further. Called Somos Calle, the small group of cooks led by young chef Marco Quelca are trying to turn food into much more than a sit-down affair. 

Street Food Hangover: Martin Morales Talks Peruvian Street Food

By Patrick Hieger

When we tried to get hold of Brit-Peruvian chef Martin Morales to contribute to our discussion of street food last week, it turns out that we contacted him just when he’d headed into the northern reaches of Peru, with only spotty internet and limited communication.  However, always eager to wax on about his home country and the food he’s attempted to share with his fellow Brits, he responded to our questions and gave us even more insight into what we should be eating, should we find ourselves on the streets of Peru.  Read below for Morales’ answers, and how he attempts to bring the flavors of Peru to his kitchens in London. 

MORALES ON THE STREETS

Getting The Real Argentina ‘Al Paso’ In Buenos Aires (ES)

By Martha Mendes

[El Banco Rojo]

[El Banco Rojo]

Buenos Aires may not have the markets of Peru, the food stands of Mexico, or the food trucks of Brazil, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get good food, at a great price, on the go.  Throughout the city there are little holes in the wall, and even a snarky fast food chain, that are offering up Argentine classics like choripan, empanadas, panchos, and more, without the fuss of having to sit down or go to one of the many parrilladas that dot the city.  If you can’t make it over to Costanera Sur for the closest thing to street food that our panel of chefs suggested, you might try out these options for a taste of Argentina when you want it.  Provecho.

Find A Diverse Array Of Dining At Santiago’s Biggest Flea Market, Persa Bio Bio

By Catie Brandl

Although regulations in Santiago are slowly changing to allow for more street food and food trucks to enter the neighborhoods where these delicacies were once prohibited, street food still holds a bit of a stigma in Chile’s capital city.  However, the real food lovers know that for the best eats around town, it’s the markets like La Vega Central and Persa Bio Bio that offer up an incredible diversity of cuisine, all at a very low price.  Our own Catie Brandl has braved the sprawl of Santiago’s largest flea market to find everything from tacos to ceviche, Mexican to Thai.  If you’re in the mood for a knick knack you won’t find anywhere else in town, and a great meal to celebrate your find, look no further than the Persa. 

[Catie Brandl]

[Catie Brandl]

A Local’s Guide To Drinking On The Streets Of Bolivia (ES)

By Maria Paula Baldiviezo

[Patrick Hieger]

[Patrick Hieger]

The gastronomy in Santa Cruz is a clear reflection of historical roots and agricultural products from the region.  Spanish colonizers introduced cows, farming birds, rice, citrus, sugar cane, and from Africa, plantains.  In the regions more to the west, in the region of Los Yungas, the Spanish brought in coffee, and other items that became part of local gastronomy.  That’s in addition to local products like corn, peanuts, yucca, squash, and fish like surubi and pacu.  It’s from these roots that typical Bolivian dishes and drinks were born, and that nowadays, besides being a cosmopolitan city, remain part of the daily Santa Cruz diet, and one of the top attractions for tourists.  

Inside The Breakfast of Champions: Arepa Con Huevo

By Joanna Marracelli

DESAYUNODECAMPEONES

Both Colombia and Venezuela can lay claim to fame for creating the quintessential street snack, the arepa.  What the pupusa is to El Salvador or a gordita for Mexico, so is an arepa for these countries.  In Colombia the arepa runs deep, going back centuries as a food consumed by the indigenous people which was later passed on to the farmers.  Today it is the premier street food in the country with countless regional variations existing from north to south.  Just like in Venezuela, particular styles, fillings and even the dough can be different depending upon where you are.  By far the most common arepa is the simple grilled variety, found on almost every street corner throughout the country.  Often a thick cake grilled directly on the street over charcoals and slathered with butter, sometimes stuffed with cheese, it is a completely irresistible snack.  If that smell of corn grilling over an open fire doesn’t grip you and make you stop in your tracks, nothing will.

Choripan, Under A Bridge

By Megan Chochla and Angelo Gonzalez

As three leading chefs from Buenos Aires informed us, Argentina just isn’t a country known for its street food.  However, if you find yourself on the street and starving for something that’s entirely Argentina, look no further than the choripan.  As iconic as the tango, the choripan might be even more Argentine than steak itself.  Read below for an explanation of the iconic dish, and one Mendocino who’s serving it up in the most unexpected of locations.

[Angelo Gonzalez]

[Angelo Gonzalez]

Three Legends Weigh In On The Importance Of Street Food In Peru (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

LEGENDS STREET FOOD PERU.JPG

By now, Lima is considered to be one of the leading cities for Latin American cuisine, sporting a team of chefs and restaurants that have conquered lists like the World’s 50 Best and Latin America’s 50 Best restaurants.  And while these temples of modern Peruvian cuisine do over an incredible new look into what the country has to offer, as well as what’s to come, it’s no secret that the best to be had in Lima is at street level.  From ceviches to anticuchos, choclo con queso and a whole variety of drinks, the street food scene is legendary, and respected by the humblest of clients, on up to Peru’s best chefs.  With such a diverse offering, choosing where to stop can be the most difficult part.  So, we turned to three of Peru’s most noted culinary figures, a pair of chefs and a culinary journalist, to find out why street food is so important, and what we shouldn’t be missing.

Even with his more than forty restaurants worldwide, if you talk to Gastón Acurio, you’ll find that his heart remains in the streets.  For Virgilio Martínez, street food remains as the path of discovery to what the people are eating.  And for Spanish critic Ignacio Medina, who was so wooed by the foods and culture of Peru many years ago that he up and moved to Lima, Peruvian street food paints a picture of the real Peru.  Below, find out what each thinks of the diverse offerings available not just in Lima, but throughout the country.  And, find out what each eat when they’re not enjoying the world-class restaurants that Lima is famous for.