Como Sur | South American Gastronomy

All posts tagged #Tegui

‘Nueva Cocina Buenos Aires’ or 14 Minutes Of Why You Should Be Planning A Trip To Argentina (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

Screen Shot 2014-10-31 at 1.05.00 PM

[FugaCrew]

When we did a profile a couple of weeks back on three Buenos Aires cooks who are doing their part to ensure that not only Argentina’s most famous city, but Argentina itself, gets the world recognition it deserves for innovative, modern cuisine, we were really only scraping the surface of the talent pool that the port city holds.  For the past few years, cooks have been stepping out of the traditional Italian and Spanish influences that, while still wildly important, don’t necessarily reflect modern trends and what Argentina as a country has to offer.  A new vision is being created of what the future in Argentina can look like, and it’s pretty delicious.

In this gorgeous new video called Nueva Cocina Buenos Aires, meet a whole group of the modern Argentine cooks and restaurants that are taking new, daring approaches to reinventing this country’s legendary cuisine.  There’s a lot of meat, for sure, but there’s a return to the land, to working with producers, and to saying that Argentina is much more than just a land of cattle and fire.  It’s a rich land with a rich history, and a bright future.  And as we mentioned in the headline, you’ll probably want to book your ticket now, because the getting is just too good.  Provecho.

The Highlights: Feria Masticar 2014 – Comer Rico Hace Bien! (ES)

By Martha Mendes

[Martha Mendes]

[Martha Mendes]

By the size of the line to get into Masticar 2014, it was easy to see that it was going to be a great event. Throughout the four days of the event, the waiting time to get into the grand pavilion was no less than an hour, and many gave up even trying when they realized that the line stretched around the corner. Nevertheless, those who remained committed to their goal didn’t regret it.

Inside the festival, the creme de la creme of Argentine cuisine got together amongst 36 different stands. Besides eating well, those who managed to get in had the chance to be waited on by famous chefs and to take advantage of chatting them up. The fair also brought together 75 producers from the region who bought the freshest, most representative products of Argentina, making for the best example of the fair’s theme “Comer Rico Hace Bien.” For those interested, there was also a program full of conferences led by those who know their way around a pot.

Mauro Colagreco Will Cook At Buenos Aires’ Tegui September 9 (ES)

By Patrick Hieger

[Tegui]

[Tegui]

What happens when a Michelin-starred Argentine chef returns home from his base in the South of France to cook a one-night-only meal?  Magic, that’s what happens.  On September 9, Mauro Colagreco will take to the stoves in his native Buenos Aires for an unforgettable, one-night only dinner with Germán Martitegui at his hidden palace Tegui in Palermo Hollywood.  The evening’s menu will consist of five courses, as prepared together by the two giants of Argentine cuisine.  The only drawback is that the dinner is exclusively for HSBC Premier clients, so you might want to check your bank account status if you’re thinking about going.  Reservations can be made by calling 5291 3333.  Don’t miss this. 

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

Tegui: Lat Am’s 50 Best Behind Closed Doors In Buenos Aires

By Patrick Hieger

Should you, as a restaurant owner, dare to put a black door in the middle of a graffiti-covered wall in the middle of one of the hippest neighborhoods in Buenos Aires and consider the five-letter name printed lightly on the door to be your only means of marketing, you’re going to raise a lot of questions, if not eyebrows.  If you search long enough, you’ll find a decent amount written about Tegui, the best restaurant in Argentina and ninth overall in Latin America according to the list of Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants, but even with that, the experience that awaits you once you pass behind that black door will still, more than likely, be much different than you were expecting.  It seems they want it that way.  Raised eyebrows or not, the only way to get to know Tegui is to go inside.

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

Much of what you’ll read about the restaurant, owned by Germán Martitegui, will focus on the size of the plates, and will use the word ‘molecular’ a lot.  Don’t expect to find liquid nitrogen-steaming spheres of air or liquefied olives that taste like pizza, though.  At its simplest, Tegui is a high-end Mediterranean restaurant with interesting plateware and a focus on modern techniques.  At its most complex, Tegui is a big, palatial dining experience that, in the modern dining scene, fully embodies the term fine-dining.  No matter how you approach Tegui, the experience is overwhelming.

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

Behind the graffiti, the black door, and the relative mystery that surrounds Tegui, you’ll find a restaurant as big and impressive as fine dining experience could offer.  A relatively simple waiting area with a small bar unfolds into an expansive dining room that is as tall as it is long, dressed simply with black and white wallpaper, big, comfortable chairs, and an open kitchen that sits in the center of dining room, visible from almost everywhere.  Don’t look for Nordic-inspired simplicity.  Tegui is the luxury that time had almost forgotten, the kind of place that you plan to go once a year for a very special occasion.

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

The reason so many are quick to say that Tegui’s cuisine is ‘molecular’–that new catch-all phrase that seems to be placed upon anything that has been reduced in size, tightened in focus and served on plates that bend and fold in ways that help the food seem that much more interesting–is because we have yet to come up with a new word that describes modern dining with touches of “science” that are there to simply make a plate look or taste just a little bit better.  It’s nothing like el Bullí or Alinea or any other restaurant where you’re not sure what you’re eating but you’re always surprised.  At Tegui, meat is meat, cheese is cheese, and the dishes, though plated interestingly, are actually rather straightforward in their approach.

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

The menu offers the option of ordering several plates a la carte, or going all-in on the nine-course tasting menu.  Wines can be deftly paired with each course, and come from the wine room that lines the front wall of the restaurant.  Dishes like beets with their greens, red berries and shaved goat cheese, or a rabbit terrine with corn ice cream and roasted peaches, or even roasted quail over a fresh corn tamale with a red wine reduction dot the menu.  The influence is heavily Mediterranean, though Argentina is still very present throughout the meal.

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

Attending to you throughout your meal is a staff of everyone from bearded hipsters to focused sommeliers, all dressed in button-down white coats and black pants.  Because dining has become so casual in many ways, it’s fun to have an experience of over-the-top everything once in awhile.  The experience of luxury at Tegui is heightened given that, in a four block radius, much more casual, tourist-friendly diners, parrillas, pizza places and even a new ramen bar make up Palermo Hollywood’s dining scene.  Tegui is a big, fancy, black and white diamond in the rough.  All hidden behind a black door and graffiti.

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

Dining across Latin America’s 50 Best is an experience in extremes, heavy contrasts, obvious luxury and true longevity.  Tegui is big and fancy and, especially by Buenos Aires terms, expensive.  But it’s definitely worth a visit.  Definitely worth the experience.  Tegui embodies the idea that looks can be deceiving, so expect the unexpected.

[photo: Patrick Hieger]

[photo: Patrick Hieger]