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All posts tagged #weekend

This Weekend in São Paulo: Vegan Pastries, Paella and Mama’s Meatballs (PO)

[Wiki Commons]

[Wiki Commons]

Need something to do this weekend in São Paulo? We’ve got you covered.

Vegan feijoada? Jackfruit coxinha? It’s possible at the Feira Vegana de Outono, or Autumn Vegan Fair, hosted by the Japanese Aichi Association in Liberdade. The two day event consists of workshops and presentations centered on vegan cooking, animal care and holistic living, and culminates with vegan chef Laura Kim giving a cooking class. Saturday and Sunday, 12 – 8pm, at Rua Santa Luzia, 74.

This Weekend In São Paulo (PO)

By Natasha Greenhouse

If you need an excuse other than simply being in Brazil to get out of the house this weekend in São Paulo, here’s four.

soylatinoSoy Latino –The second edition of this festival takes place this Saturday, October 18 at the Memorial da América Latina to celebrate the region’s music, dance, food and culture. Come sample the best of Latin food establishments around the city, including Sabores de Mi Tierra (Colombia), La Cholita (Bolivia), La Favorita (Argentina) and La Peruana (Peru).

 

 
comidinhasFestival de Comidinhas – Every Saturday and Sunday in Jardins a group of chefs and their food trucks get together to offer foods from around the world as well as regional Brazilian dishes. The menu changes every weekend, as does the band playing, so it’s always a new experience. This month it debuted Lamen 4 U, the first ever ramen truck.

 

[photo: Como Sur]

A Delicious Weekend In Curicó, Chile

By: Patrick Hieger

Were you to ask many a Santiaguino where Curicó is, the answer would most likely be an, “I don’t know,” paired with a blank stare.  When writers come to Chile to do stories on the best that the country has to offer, small agricultural towns like Curicó or any in Chile’s seventh region for that matter won’t likely be part of their tour.  However, with a growing population, a wine culture that is as good as any in the country, and two of the hottest annual foods-related festivals to their credit, Curicó is a place worth looking at, if not thoroughly enjoying.

Located just around 200 kilometers south of Santiago, Curicó is an agricultural hotbed with a solid football team and a history of cycling.  Residents ride bikes as much as they drive cars and, when they’re not working or playing, enjoy some of the finest regional cooking that Chile has to offer.  As part of a recent long weekend trip to the Maule region’s main hub, I had the chance to enjoy the best culinary offerings the city has to offer.  What’s more–they’re only getting started.

Before even arriving at Curicó’s Hotel Raices, we got off the highway in Romeral to enjoy the famed plateada (beef brisket) at Colo Colo.  Ask anyone in the region and even people in other parts of the country and they’ll tell you that, if it’s meat you want, it’s Colo Colo you must have.  Braised for hours and served in handmade clay pots from Chile’s Pomaire, the brisket was as flavorful as it was tender, especially when bathed in its own braising liquids.  For starters we had the traditional ‘arrollado de huaso’ (spiced, braised pork wrapped in fork-tender pig skin) as well as the ‘patas de chancho’ (boiled pigs’ trotters), both equally delicious.  Wash it down with a silky ‘puré de castaños’ (chestnut puree) and you’ll sleep like a baby.  A great way to start any trip to Curicó.

Waking up full but undaunted, we headed to the hotel’s nicely appointed and modern café for coffee and pastries, a solid start for a cold morning in the country.  From there we headed to Marcelino Pastelería on Plaza España for a taste of the famous ‘torta curicana,’ a layered dessert made of thin, unleavened dough and manjar, Chile’s answer to dulce de leche.  They do sell full-sized caked, but we opted for the smaller, more manageable cookie-sized option.  Lunch was still to come.

[photo: Como Sur]

[photo: Como Sur]

It being the weekend and all and with lunch still a couple hours away, we treated ourselves to a ‘malta con harina’ at Dumbo.  Chile’s use of toasted flour in everything from wine to malted beer and even as a topping on watermelon in summertime may seem strange, but in the past it was a staple for guys going off to work who needed a full stomach.  The dark, creamy malted beer is served with a spoonful or two of toasted flour which you then stir into the beer.  Drink, stir repeat.  It’s not a drink you nurse.  Dumbo certainly isn’t for everybody–the locals will definitely give out-of-towners a thorough once-over, but a creamy black beer mixed with the nutty toasted flour is well worth the scrutiny.  That, and you could theoretically skip a meal for the day.  Although, naturally, we did not.

For lunch, we headed back to Plaza España to the rustic-meets-modern take on classic Chilean dishes, Emporio.  We ordered the quinoa timbal with fresh greens, a deliciously simple preparation of cooked quinoa and lime, served with wedges of goat cheese and the freshest greens that the area is known for.  Our ‘plato de fondo’ was a braised lamb shank with potatoes, a simple dish teeming with as much flavor as the brisket we had eaten the night before.  The meal was paired with wines from Miguel Torres, the luxurious winery located just three kilometers south of Curicó, where we would also be enjoying dinner.

[photo: Como Sur]

[photo: Como Sur]

What makes the Miguel Torres winery amazing is the same thing that make a weekend in Curicó so much fun–it’s unexpected.  Nestled just off the highway and behind a large, wooden gate, the Miguel Torres restaurant is ground zero for superb food in Curicó.  Sit among luscious grape vines and tall Alamo trees and take in the simple, but elegant architecture that makes the dining room as much your home as it is a temple to innovative cuisine.  There, we enjoyed dishes like fried risotto with parmesan foam, grilled octopus with goat cheese, and another, even richer itteration of brisket, this time in Wagyu form.  They do offer a set lunch ‘menú’, but the a la carte options are worth the money.  So are the wines.

[image: Como Sur]

[image: Como Sur]

 

[photo: Como Sur]

[photo: Como Sur]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The life of a food writer isn’t easy–there’s always more to eat.  So, regardless of the epic day of food we had had the day before, we once again awoke hungry, and ready to eat.  Breakfast, this time, was in the form of meat and eggs at Cecinas Soler.  We ordered another arrollado de huaso, this time sliced and served with fresh tomatoes.  The ‘paila de huevos’ (literally, a pile of eggs and ham) with toasted bread was to die for.  Best eggs ever.  Period.  And on the way out, their sausages and other charcuterie products are for sale.  I highly advise taking home as much as will fit in your trunk.

[photo: Como Sur]

[photo: Como Sur]

Full, but undaunted, we headed towards Estadio Español for their fixed lunch menú.  The sporting club’s restaurant features antique architecture and a feel that is all at once elegant, rustic, and inviting.  Not quite the modern temple of luxury that is Miguel Torres, Estadio Español is perhaps even more inviting.  Throughout the week they offer a fixed menu and, although the price goes up slightly on the weekends, the value remains and the meal is absolutely worth it.  To begin there is a salad bar of fresh salads, warm dishes, hot soup and other vegetables.  The soup and salad are a meal in themselves, but entrées like beef tenderloin ‘a lo pobre’ or perfectly roasted fish with quinoa make you want more.  Dessert, coffee, and wine are also included.

[photo: Como Sur]

[photo: Como Sur]

Finally, though with no less gusto, we headed back to Plaza España for, no surprise, tapas at El Tablao.  If you’re reading this and asking yourself how we could have possibly eaten another bite, don’t worry.  We only ordered the tapas because, while the entrées looked great, the tapas looked even better.  A honey-drizzled pintxo called the ‘Elvis,’ a mini-paella laced with saffron, chicken and fresh peas, a russian salad and papas bravas.  This was the perfect end to a perfect weekend, all washed down with Curicó’s 1758 beers, a local delicacy that’s as good as any microbrew in Santiago.

[photo: Como Sur]

[photo: Como Sur]

Throughout the year Curicó plays host to several festivals worth visiting as well.  Their annual wine harvest or ‘Vendimia’ festival brings together wines, crafts, hand-crafted foods and other goods from around the region.  There’s also the annual ‘Encuentro de Caldillos y Cazuelas,’ a celebration of various soups, stews and other goods from around the country.  Just this year there were cooking demos from such notable Chilean chefs like Pilar Rodriguez and Matías Palomo.

[photo: Como Sur]

[photo: Como Sur]

And that was Curicó.  Or, at least, part of it.  Which is to say, Curicó is a small town with a big heart.  There’s a mall, a movie theater and even a velodrome.  Berner beers also contend with 1758 and the local wines won’t stay under the radar for much longer, and growth like this is happening across Chile.  Small towns are creating identity for themselves and for the nation.  So next time you’re stuck in Santiago and looking for something different to do, jump in your car or simply get on a bus and head south.  You’ll be glad you did.